Nestor (genus)

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?Nestor
Kākā (Nestor meridionalis)
Kākā
(Nestor meridionalis)
Klasifikasi ilmiah
Kerajaan: Animalia
Filum: Chordata
Kelas: Aves
Ordo: Psittaciformes
Famili: Psittacidae
Upafamili: Psittacinae
Bangsa: Nestorini
Genus: Nestor
Lesson, 1830
Spesies

N. notabilis
N. meridionalis
N. productus

Genus Nestor, satu-satunya genus bangsa Nestorini, terdiri dari dua spesies bayan dari Selandia Baru dan satu spesies yang telah punah dari Pulau Norfolk, Australia.

Daftar spesies[sunting | sunting sumber]

  • Kea, Nestor notabilis
  • Kākā, Nestor meridionalis
    • Kākā Pulau Utara, Nestor meridionalis septentrionalis
    • Kākā Pulau Selatan, Nestor meridionalis meridionalis
  • Kākā Pulau Norfolk, Nestor productus (punah)
Nestorini
Common name
(binomial name)
status
Image Description Range and habitat
Kea

(Nestor notabilis)
Vulnerable[1]

Kea (Nestor notabilis) -on ground-8.jpg
48 cm (19 in) long. Mostly olive-green with scarlet underwings and rump. Dark-edged feathers. Dark brown beak, iris, legs, and feet. Male has longer bill.[2] New Zealand: South Island

High-level forests and subalpine scrublands 850–1400 m AMSL.[3]
South Island Kaka

(Nestor meridionalis meridionalis)
Endangered[4]

Kaka -Stewart Island-1c.jpg
Similar to the North Island Kaka, but slightly smaller, brighter colours, the crown is almost white, and the bill is longer and more arched in males.[5] New Zealand: South Island

Unbroken tracts of Nothofagus and Podocarpus forests 450–850 m AMSL in summer and 0–550 m in winter.[3]
North Island Kaka

(Nestor meridionalis septentrionalis)
Endangered[4]

Kaka-Parrots.jpg
About 45 cm (18 in) long. Mainly olive-brown with dark feather edges. Crimson underwings, rump, and collar. The cheeks are golden/brown. The crown is greyish.[5] New Zealand: North Island

Unbroken tracts of Nothofagus and Podocarpus forests between 450–850 m AMSL in summer and 0–550 m in winter.[3]
Norfolk Kaka

(Nestor productus)
Extinct by 1851 approx.[6]

John-Gould-001.jpg
About 38 cm long. Mostly olive-brown upperparts, (reddish-)orange cheeks and throat, straw-coloured breast, thighs, rump and lower abdomen dark orange.[7] Formerly endemic on Norfolk Island and Phillip Island of Australia[8]

Rocks and trees[7]
Chatham Kaka

(Nestor sp.)
Extinct by 1550–1700[9]

Appearance unknown, but bones indicate reduced flight capability. Only known from subfossil bones.[9] Formerly endemic on Chatham Island of New Zealand

Forests[9]

Referensi[sunting | sunting sumber]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2008). Nestor notabilis. Daftar Merah Spesies Terancam IUCN 2008. IUCN 2008. Diakses pada 24 December 2008. Database entry includes a range map and justification for why this species is endangered.
  2. ^ "Kea - BirdLife Species Factsheet". BirdLife International. 2008. 
  3. ^ a b c Juniper, Tony; Mike Parr (1998). Parrots: A Guide to Parrots of the World. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0300074536. 
  4. ^ a b BirdLife International (2008). Nestor meridionalis. Daftar Merah Spesies Terancam IUCN 2008. IUCN 2008. Diakses pada 24 December 2008. Database entry includes a range map and justification for why this species is endangered.
  5. ^ a b "Kaka - BirdLife Species Factsheet". BirdLife International. 2008. 
  6. ^ BirdLife International (2008). Nestor productus. Daftar Merah Spesies Terancam IUCN 2008. IUCN 2008. Diakses pada 24 December 2008. Database entry includes a range map and justification for why this species is endangered.
  7. ^ a b Forshaw, Joseph M.; Cooper, William T. (1981) [1973, 1978]. Parrots of the World (ed. corrected second edition). David & Charles, Newton Abbot, London. ISBN 0-7153-7698-5. 
  8. ^ "Norfolk Island Kaka - BirdLife Species Factsheet". BirdLife International. 2008. 
  9. ^ a b c Millener, P. R. (1999). "The history of the Chatham Islands’ bird fauna of the last 7000 years – a chronicle of change and extinction. Proceedings of the 4th International meeting of the Society of Avian Paleontology and Evolution (Washington, D.C., June 1996).". Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology 89: 85–109.